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    REVIEW - Marvel Zombies #1
Title: Part 1 of 5
Writer: Robert Kirkman
Artist: Sean Phillips

Zombies. That’s right people, zombies. This 5 issue series focuses on the idea that the entire Marvel universe has been infected by a deadly virus turning them into the flesh eating creatures we have all known to come and love. It sounds crazy, and believe me it is. It is also however, suprisingly entertaining.
First thing to get to grips with is this story does not take place in “our world” but rather in another dimension, which basically means writer Robert Kirkman can do as he pleases without worrying about the after effects on characters. The heroes we know and love are no more in Kirkmans world. Spider-man, Captain America, even Hulk. All Marvel characters are now flesh eating zombies. Whats interesting though is the zombies, although looking terrifying and have a hunger for flesh, do infact have their memories and speech intact. It’s an interesting concept, and it works brilliantly. Kirkman knows the heroes he is writing, as each Marvel zombie presents the same behaviour and personality we would expect. However, Kirkman injects the horror into each character, making them familar and yet frightful. Whats presented is characters who we think we know but are infact damaged in every sense of the word, and survival is the only thing that matters to them. And by survive, I mean eating any non zombie they come across, like Magneto.
Yes the “worlds strongest mutant” is one of the few surivivors in this apocolyptic world, and this issues primary focus is on Magneto attempting to escape from the mass army of marvel zombies who intend to eat him for lunch. Yummy. Kirkman makes no hesitation in jumping into the action right off the bat, and the action is exciting as well as gruesome. We witness Magneto hurl objects this way and that, with hurling a iron girder straight through Daredevil’s stomach being one of the many “Oh dam!” moments.
However, although entertaining, what the issue lacks is an actual introduction. it feels as if there should be a previous issue or something to explain the situation, as it feels you’ve just been plunged straight into the action without any real indication of whats going on. Perhaps more will be explained in future issues, but at the moment it lets the comic down. I understand the comic is meant to be a action packed gory read, but a story without any real introduction or backbone is a real let down.
Sean Phillips provides the artwork, and whats immedialtly noticeable is he knows how to draw a apocolyptic world. Buildings are destroyed, cities are deserted, you get a real sense this is not the Marvel universe we have come to know. Character wise, his art is pretty much spot on. The Marvel characters are drawn to look like themselves, but are also drawn in such a way that really brings out the horror side to the story. My favourite by far is Spider-man. His iconic suit is noticeable, but his mask is ripped, revealing a ghoulish almost skeleton like appearance underneath.
Marvel Zombies is not meant to be taken seriously. If your looking for a deep engaging narrative, Marvel Zombies probably isnt for you. If however your looking for a different kind of Marvel comic unlike any other on the market, then this comics is defintely a safe bet.
VERDICT
Story: 8/10
Art: 7/10

    REVIEW - Marvel Zombies #1

    Title: Part 1 of 5

    Writer: Robert Kirkman

    Artist: Sean Phillips

    Zombies. That’s right people, zombies. This 5 issue series focuses on the idea that the entire Marvel universe has been infected by a deadly virus turning them into the flesh eating creatures we have all known to come and love. It sounds crazy, and believe me it is. It is also however, suprisingly entertaining.

    First thing to get to grips with is this story does not take place in “our world” but rather in another dimension, which basically means writer Robert Kirkman can do as he pleases without worrying about the after effects on characters. The heroes we know and love are no more in Kirkmans world. Spider-man, Captain America, even Hulk. All Marvel characters are now flesh eating zombies. Whats interesting though is the zombies, although looking terrifying and have a hunger for flesh, do infact have their memories and speech intact. It’s an interesting concept, and it works brilliantly. Kirkman knows the heroes he is writing, as each Marvel zombie presents the same behaviour and personality we would expect. However, Kirkman injects the horror into each character, making them familar and yet frightful. Whats presented is characters who we think we know but are infact damaged in every sense of the word, and survival is the only thing that matters to them. And by survive, I mean eating any non zombie they come across, like Magneto.

    Yes the “worlds strongest mutant” is one of the few surivivors in this apocolyptic world, and this issues primary focus is on Magneto attempting to escape from the mass army of marvel zombies who intend to eat him for lunch. Yummy. Kirkman makes no hesitation in jumping into the action right off the bat, and the action is exciting as well as gruesome. We witness Magneto hurl objects this way and that, with hurling a iron girder straight through Daredevil’s stomach being one of the many “Oh dam!” moments.

    However, although entertaining, what the issue lacks is an actual introduction. it feels as if there should be a previous issue or something to explain the situation, as it feels you’ve just been plunged straight into the action without any real indication of whats going on. Perhaps more will be explained in future issues, but at the moment it lets the comic down. I understand the comic is meant to be a action packed gory read, but a story without any real introduction or backbone is a real let down.

    Sean Phillips provides the artwork, and whats immedialtly noticeable is he knows how to draw a apocolyptic world. Buildings are destroyed, cities are deserted, you get a real sense this is not the Marvel universe we have come to know. Character wise, his art is pretty much spot on. The Marvel characters are drawn to look like themselves, but are also drawn in such a way that really brings out the horror side to the story. My favourite by far is Spider-man. His iconic suit is noticeable, but his mask is ripped, revealing a ghoulish almost skeleton like appearance underneath.

    Marvel Zombies is not meant to be taken seriously. If your looking for a deep engaging narrative, Marvel Zombies probably isnt for you. If however your looking for a different kind of Marvel comic unlike any other on the market, then this comics is defintely a safe bet.

    VERDICT

    Story: 8/10

    Art: 7/10

    — 1 year ago with 4 notes
    #marvelzombiesreview  #marvel zombies  #zombies  #marvel  #comics  #horror  #captain america  #spiderman  #hulk  #luke cage  #magneto  #vulture  #iron man  #marvelzombiesreviews  #marvelzombiereview  #marvelzombiereviews 
    REVIEW - Batman Detective Comics #12
Title: The Killer Inside
Writer: Tony S. Daniel
Artist: Tony S. Daniel
Inks: Richard Friend
Colours: Tomeu Morey

NO NO NO NO NO. This is not how your supposed to end your run on Detective Comics Tony S. Daniel. I wanted to like this Mr. Toxic arc and for a short while I actually did. But this final issue of Tony’s just falls flat and feels like a comic that just doesn’t have a enthusiastic writer behind it at all.
The main thing I was looking for in this issue was the backstory behind Mr. Toxic and his intentions. With Mr. Toxic being an entirely knew villain created for the New 52, there is no known backstory or history behind him, so I myself was very eager to learn about him and his intentions. While there is an attempt to connect the threads and give an insight into who he is and his intentions, it all just feels very rushed and not thought out. There is a clear understanding he is dieing and so uses the particle accelerator to accelerate cell growth so he doesn’t die, but aside from that nothing else about him is really explained to the reader. How did Mr. Toxic get his suit? How are the clones actually created? When your given the opportunity to create a entirely new character to sell to a budding audience, you take that opportunity. Unfortunately Tony S. Daniel doesn’t, leaving Mr. Toxic at the end of this issue a very forgettable villain indeed.
I wish I could say that Batmans take down of Mr. Toxic is better, but really its mediocre at best. There is no actual “fighting” so to say, as all that happens is Batman heats the reaction occuring using a concentrated dose of the chemical he discovers previously to prevent Mr. Toxic from regenerating his cells. While its not short of energetic, it lacks real exictment and by the end your just left feeling, “wow is that it?” Dissapointing stuff.
At least the artworks good. Sort of. The artwork really stands out in the first half of the comic or so, with the first few pages being a prime example of this. Batman looks as great as ever and the two page spread when you turn the first page just screams out “Hell yeah, I’m Batman B*tches.”  Speaking of two page spreads, this issue features a lot of them, but as a result they feel there just being used to make up space in the comic, and as result the spreads further into the comic lose their effect on the reader and also look a lot less exciting as well.
Luckily, there is one good thing to say about this comic.. The back up story! It sounds insane seeing as the previous Two-Face backup stories have been awful, but this stand alone backup story is great. The backup story carries on events first found wayyyy back in issue one, with that being the fact the Joker is missing and his face has been removed. The backup story follows a detective known as Nancy who’s job is to monitor the face of the Joker in the police department. The narrative is pretty simple, but its simplicity is what makes it great. Added to this, its sense of eerieness and creepyness is everpresent, then again what would you expect on a story focusing on the Joker? The last page reveals the Joker is far from missing as he plans to get his face back, and its this revalation that will lead into Scott Snyders run on “Batman” starting in issue 13.
Overall then, Tony S. Daniels last issue with his run on Detective Comics is far from a masterpiece, and just feels like his heart isn’t in it anymore. I wish him all the best, but I really am looking forward to the next issue due to the whole new creative team. A new team is just what Detective Comics needs at the moment, and I’m very much looking forward to it.
VERDICT - Main Story
Story: 4/10
Art: 6/10
VERDICT - Back Up Story
Story: 8/10
Art: 7/10

    REVIEW - Batman Detective Comics #12

    Title: The Killer Inside

    Writer: Tony S. Daniel

    Artist: Tony S. Daniel

    Inks: Richard Friend

    Colours: Tomeu Morey

    NO NO NO NO NO. This is not how your supposed to end your run on Detective Comics Tony S. Daniel. I wanted to like this Mr. Toxic arc and for a short while I actually did. But this final issue of Tony’s just falls flat and feels like a comic that just doesn’t have a enthusiastic writer behind it at all.

    The main thing I was looking for in this issue was the backstory behind Mr. Toxic and his intentions. With Mr. Toxic being an entirely knew villain created for the New 52, there is no known backstory or history behind him, so I myself was very eager to learn about him and his intentions. While there is an attempt to connect the threads and give an insight into who he is and his intentions, it all just feels very rushed and not thought out. There is a clear understanding he is dieing and so uses the particle accelerator to accelerate cell growth so he doesn’t die, but aside from that nothing else about him is really explained to the reader. How did Mr. Toxic get his suit? How are the clones actually created? When your given the opportunity to create a entirely new character to sell to a budding audience, you take that opportunity. Unfortunately Tony S. Daniel doesn’t, leaving Mr. Toxic at the end of this issue a very forgettable villain indeed.

    I wish I could say that Batmans take down of Mr. Toxic is better, but really its mediocre at best. There is no actual “fighting” so to say, as all that happens is Batman heats the reaction occuring using a concentrated dose of the chemical he discovers previously to prevent Mr. Toxic from regenerating his cells. While its not short of energetic, it lacks real exictment and by the end your just left feeling, “wow is that it?” Dissapointing stuff.

    At least the artworks good. Sort of. The artwork really stands out in the first half of the comic or so, with the first few pages being a prime example of this. Batman looks as great as ever and the two page spread when you turn the first page just screams out “Hell yeah, I’m Batman B*tches.”  Speaking of two page spreads, this issue features a lot of them, but as a result they feel there just being used to make up space in the comic, and as result the spreads further into the comic lose their effect on the reader and also look a lot less exciting as well.

    Luckily, there is one good thing to say about this comic.. The back up story! It sounds insane seeing as the previous Two-Face backup stories have been awful, but this stand alone backup story is great. The backup story carries on events first found wayyyy back in issue one, with that being the fact the Joker is missing and his face has been removed. The backup story follows a detective known as Nancy who’s job is to monitor the face of the Joker in the police department. The narrative is pretty simple, but its simplicity is what makes it great. Added to this, its sense of eerieness and creepyness is everpresent, then again what would you expect on a story focusing on the Joker? The last page reveals the Joker is far from missing as he plans to get his face back, and its this revalation that will lead into Scott Snyders run on “Batman” starting in issue 13.

    Overall then, Tony S. Daniels last issue with his run on Detective Comics is far from a masterpiece, and just feels like his heart isn’t in it anymore. I wish him all the best, but I really am looking forward to the next issue due to the whole new creative team. A new team is just what Detective Comics needs at the moment, and I’m very much looking forward to it.

    VERDICT - Main Story

    Story: 4/10

    Art: 6/10

    VERDICT - Back Up Story

    Story: 8/10

    Art: 7/10

    — 1 year ago with 2 notes
    #detectivecomicsreviews  #detective comics  #dc  #DC comics  #new 52  #batman  #mr toxic  #Commissioner Gordon  #comics  #comic reviews  #Tony S.Daniel 
    REVIEW - JLA #5
Title: Woman Of Tomorrow
Writer: Grant Morrison
Art: Howard Porter
Inks: John Dell

So with the Hyperclan storyline done and dusted, Morrison is given a clean sheet to weave his magic with Earths greatest heroes. This issue instead of a new storyline is a story self contained to this issue, and while perhaps the change of pace is nice, it doesn’t match up to any of the issues seen in the Hyperclan storyline.
The one off story focuses on quite a interesting concept, the JLA wanting to recruit a new member to the league due to claims of them being elitist. This allows less prominent heroes to feature in the issue, with such heroes such as Green Arrow, Damage and even Plastic Man. The heroes go through a series of interviews, with in some cases humorous results, such as Hitman once turned down responds by saying , “Hey, I only came along to check out Wonder Woman with my X-ray vision. Now I can die happy.” Comic sexism at its finest.
The selection process is bottled down to Green Arrow and Aztek, that is until the mysterious Tomorrow Woman arrives and steals the show with her psychic powers and quickly makes the team. We discover things arent all as they seem as we discover Tommorow Woman is actually a artifical creation by two made scientists, sent to destroy the JLA with a special psychic wave she possesses.
It sounds like a good premises for a story, but unfortunately things fall flat quickly. The team are sent to take down a secret weapon that has been released, but the weapon just seems to appear from nowhere. There is an attempt to explain where its come from and what it does, but it just seems thrown together so Tomorrow Woman can actually execute her Psychic wave on all of the JLA.
But of course to no surprise, she doesn’t. No Tomorrow Woman is so clever she overrides her system and sacrifices herself to destroy the weapon and save the day. However, its quickly revealed the override was one of the scientists plan in the first place to show his peer he can build the more advanced machine. Really? It was your plan in the first place, when you actually had a genuine opportunity to kill the JLA? The whole concept just falls flat and I’m left disappointed when everything ends. The whole “bad gone good last minute” idea has been used numerous times in comics and so doesn’t have an original or special feel at all. It just feels like a quickly thrown together story without any real thought or concept behind it.
Its also important to note that aside from Batman’s comment on Superman by saying “nice outfit”, noone seems to notice Superman’s dramatic change that he is now blue. In case your wondering, at this point in time in Superman’s individual comic run, Superman is exposed to an enemy which alters Superman’s appearance and powers, turning him blue and giving him electrical powers. Its nice to see the individual Superman comic ties in with the JLA, but the fact noone notices or seems to care just doesn’t help give this issue any credibility. The artwork at least gives the comic a nice touch. The change in Superman’s appearance doesn’t stop him looking his heroic self, and the Flash along with many others look brilliant as they take on their roles as Earths protectors.
Overall then, the comic despite its promising opening quickly falls into a unoriginal and boring issue with some nice artwork. Maybe Morrison is just recharging his batteries or is saving better things for the storyline that begins next issue. Here’s hoping so anyway.
VERDICT
STORY: 5/10
ART: 7/10

    REVIEW - JLA #5

    Title: Woman Of Tomorrow

    Writer: Grant Morrison

    Art: Howard Porter

    Inks: John Dell

    So with the Hyperclan storyline done and dusted, Morrison is given a clean sheet to weave his magic with Earths greatest heroes. This issue instead of a new storyline is a story self contained to this issue, and while perhaps the change of pace is nice, it doesn’t match up to any of the issues seen in the Hyperclan storyline.

    The one off story focuses on quite a interesting concept, the JLA wanting to recruit a new member to the league due to claims of them being elitist. This allows less prominent heroes to feature in the issue, with such heroes such as Green Arrow, Damage and even Plastic Man. The heroes go through a series of interviews, with in some cases humorous results, such as Hitman once turned down responds by saying , “Hey, I only came along to check out Wonder Woman with my X-ray vision. Now I can die happy.” Comic sexism at its finest.

    The selection process is bottled down to Green Arrow and Aztek, that is until the mysterious Tomorrow Woman arrives and steals the show with her psychic powers and quickly makes the team. We discover things arent all as they seem as we discover Tommorow Woman is actually a artifical creation by two made scientists, sent to destroy the JLA with a special psychic wave she possesses.

    It sounds like a good premises for a story, but unfortunately things fall flat quickly. The team are sent to take down a secret weapon that has been released, but the weapon just seems to appear from nowhere. There is an attempt to explain where its come from and what it does, but it just seems thrown together so Tomorrow Woman can actually execute her Psychic wave on all of the JLA.

    But of course to no surprise, she doesn’t. No Tomorrow Woman is so clever she overrides her system and sacrifices herself to destroy the weapon and save the day. However, its quickly revealed the override was one of the scientists plan in the first place to show his peer he can build the more advanced machine. Really? It was your plan in the first place, when you actually had a genuine opportunity to kill the JLA? The whole concept just falls flat and I’m left disappointed when everything ends. The whole “bad gone good last minute” idea has been used numerous times in comics and so doesn’t have an original or special feel at all. It just feels like a quickly thrown together story without any real thought or concept behind it.

    Its also important to note that aside from Batman’s comment on Superman by saying “nice outfit”, noone seems to notice Superman’s dramatic change that he is now blue. In case your wondering, at this point in time in Superman’s individual comic run, Superman is exposed to an enemy which alters Superman’s appearance and powers, turning him blue and giving him electrical powers. Its nice to see the individual Superman comic ties in with the JLA, but the fact noone notices or seems to care just doesn’t help give this issue any credibility. The artwork at least gives the comic a nice touch. The change in Superman’s appearance doesn’t stop him looking his heroic self, and the Flash along with many others look brilliant as they take on their roles as Earths protectors.

    Overall then, the comic despite its promising opening quickly falls into a unoriginal and boring issue with some nice artwork. Maybe Morrison is just recharging his batteries or is saving better things for the storyline that begins next issue. Here’s hoping so anyway.

    VERDICT

    STORY: 5/10

    ART: 7/10

    — 1 year ago with 1 note
    #jlareviews  #jla  #superheroes  #superman  #batman  #bruce wayne  #Flash  #green lantern  #martian manhunter  #Wonder Woman  #green arrow  #damage  #hitman  #guy gardner  #plastic man  #tomorrow woman  #dc  #dc comics  #comic reviews  #comics 
    REVIEW - JLA #4
Title: Invaders From Mars
Writer: Grant Morrison
Art: Howard Porter
Inks: John Dell

So we come to the end of the first storyline in Grant Morrison’s run on the JLA. Although this issue is entertaining, it doesn’t have the same feel as the brilliant previous three issues. Therefore, despite the comic having its fair amount of high points, it isn’t on the same level as the previous issues.
The beginning of the issue is the first of my problems. Last issue we witness Superman trapped by Protex due to kryptonite poisoning, and at the beginning of the issue Superman breaks free from its control. How does he do it? Well turns out it wasn’t even kryptonite in the first place, just a mind control trick by Protex due to him being a Martian. The concept just seems weak, and if Superman could just escape from sheer willpower alone, why didn’t he just do it in the first place? It just seems a rushed attempt to get Superman free and back into the action.
My other real big problem is the lack of explanation regarding how the Hyperclan are actually alive and free. We discover by now the Hyperclan are from the same planet as Martian Manhunter, and with the planet being destroyed it brings light onto why Martian Manhunter wanted to try and help the Hyperclan previously. That’s all ok, but when its explained the Hyperclan and the rest of the pale skinned Martians were banished to a place known as the “Still Zone”, things become confusing. If they were banished, how are they now suddenly free? Did the destruction of the Martian planet free them? And what of the other banished Martians? What happened to them? There is just so many things not properly explained, and with the excellent storytelling seen in previous issues, its a big let down.
On the other hand, the comic does have some great moments. The Martians altering their matter to change them into frightful monsters is a high point, and the battle that follows, in particular Superman against Protex, is brilliant. Another great thing is the comic gives Aquaman his little chance in the spotlight. Its often said Aquaman is the odd one out in the group, with people arguing what can he actually do? Well without even laying a finger on Zum, Aquaman eliminates him by tapping into the water part of Zums brain and giving him a seizure. Pretty cool stuff.
The ending I’m a little split on though, as its good and bad. In a good sense, it shows how the JLA construct their watchtower on the moon, which is memorable and sets up the premises for the teams base of operations. On the other hand, the epilogue of the issue is confusing. Shortly before, Martian Manhunter asks to be alone with Protex to punish him in accordance with his planets custom, but what ensues is left unshown until the epilogue. It shows a human called Bob getting ready for work as a firefighter, but it explains him having strange dreams as did 69 other people. The reflection in the mirror reveals Bob is Protex without his former memory, but it leaves you confused. So the great punishment is turning them into humans? If Protex had his former memory maybe it would be a punishment due him hating humans, but he clearly doesn’t have his former memory. Surely Martian Manhunter would have a greater punishment, maybe not kill, but still the concept seems to not make much sense.
The comic does shine particulary with the fantastic artwork by Porter. The fight scenes are crisp and full of life, and even Green Lantern looks a whole lot better in this issue. The artwork really shines in the Superman vs Protex fight though, with the menacing monster Protex drawn fericously while Superman drawn in all his greatness looks brilliant as always.
Overall then, maybe this issue isn’t the greatest ending to the storyline it could have been. Regardless, its still an entertaining read, and it isn’t going to stop me from reading more of Morrisons run on the JLA.
VERDICT
STORY: 6.5/10
ART: 7.5/10

    REVIEW - JLA #4

    Title: Invaders From Mars

    Writer: Grant Morrison

    Art: Howard Porter

    Inks: John Dell

    So we come to the end of the first storyline in Grant Morrison’s run on the JLA. Although this issue is entertaining, it doesn’t have the same feel as the brilliant previous three issues. Therefore, despite the comic having its fair amount of high points, it isn’t on the same level as the previous issues.

    The beginning of the issue is the first of my problems. Last issue we witness Superman trapped by Protex due to kryptonite poisoning, and at the beginning of the issue Superman breaks free from its control. How does he do it? Well turns out it wasn’t even kryptonite in the first place, just a mind control trick by Protex due to him being a Martian. The concept just seems weak, and if Superman could just escape from sheer willpower alone, why didn’t he just do it in the first place? It just seems a rushed attempt to get Superman free and back into the action.

    My other real big problem is the lack of explanation regarding how the Hyperclan are actually alive and free. We discover by now the Hyperclan are from the same planet as Martian Manhunter, and with the planet being destroyed it brings light onto why Martian Manhunter wanted to try and help the Hyperclan previously. That’s all ok, but when its explained the Hyperclan and the rest of the pale skinned Martians were banished to a place known as the “Still Zone”, things become confusing. If they were banished, how are they now suddenly free? Did the destruction of the Martian planet free them? And what of the other banished Martians? What happened to them? There is just so many things not properly explained, and with the excellent storytelling seen in previous issues, its a big let down.

    On the other hand, the comic does have some great moments. The Martians altering their matter to change them into frightful monsters is a high point, and the battle that follows, in particular Superman against Protex, is brilliant. Another great thing is the comic gives Aquaman his little chance in the spotlight. Its often said Aquaman is the odd one out in the group, with people arguing what can he actually do? Well without even laying a finger on Zum, Aquaman eliminates him by tapping into the water part of Zums brain and giving him a seizure. Pretty cool stuff.

    The ending I’m a little split on though, as its good and bad. In a good sense, it shows how the JLA construct their watchtower on the moon, which is memorable and sets up the premises for the teams base of operations. On the other hand, the epilogue of the issue is confusing. Shortly before, Martian Manhunter asks to be alone with Protex to punish him in accordance with his planets custom, but what ensues is left unshown until the epilogue. It shows a human called Bob getting ready for work as a firefighter, but it explains him having strange dreams as did 69 other people. The reflection in the mirror reveals Bob is Protex without his former memory, but it leaves you confused. So the great punishment is turning them into humans? If Protex had his former memory maybe it would be a punishment due him hating humans, but he clearly doesn’t have his former memory. Surely Martian Manhunter would have a greater punishment, maybe not kill, but still the concept seems to not make much sense.

    The comic does shine particulary with the fantastic artwork by Porter. The fight scenes are crisp and full of life, and even Green Lantern looks a whole lot better in this issue. The artwork really shines in the Superman vs Protex fight though, with the menacing monster Protex drawn fericously while Superman drawn in all his greatness looks brilliant as always.

    Overall then, maybe this issue isn’t the greatest ending to the storyline it could have been. Regardless, its still an entertaining read, and it isn’t going to stop me from reading more of Morrisons run on the JLA.

    VERDICT

    STORY: 6.5/10

    ART: 7.5/10

    — 1 year ago
    #jlareviews  #jla  #superheroes  #superman  #batman  #bruce wayne  #Flash  #green lantern  #Wonder Woman  #martian manhunter  #aquaman  #comics  #dc  #DC comics  #grant morrison  #comic reviews 
    REVIEW - JLA #3
Title: War Of The Worlds
Writer: Grant Morrison
Art: Howard Porter
Inks: John Dell
With the majority of the Justice League captured, its down to Flash, Green Lantern and Batman to save the day in these bleak times. What ensues is a issue full of energy and excitement, but perhaps most importantly, fun.
It would seem hard to make a comic dealing with the potential end of the world fun, but Grant Morrison does it brilliantly. Morrison makes Flash and Green Lantern as the younger heroes of the team much more entertaining. Be it a simple joke or just the occasional banter between the two heroes, Morrison the issue shine with the two young heroes by displaying there not the same as say Superman, but their youthful and entertaining personalities make them likeable in their own way.
However, despite all their youthful enthusiasm, things take a turn for the worse. Even though through their valiant effort, the two heroes fail to defeat the members of the Hyperclan. So who’s left to take on the Hyperclan and save the Earth? Batman.
Last issue we witnesses Batman crash his jet into the ground and explode, but naturally its going to take more than that to kill the dark knight. If the Flash and Green Lantern hadn’t made this issue great already, well Batman just makes it awesome by completely stealing the spotlight and showing that although not having powers, he really is the most dangerous guy on Earth. His scenes are drawn and narrated beautifully, and it gives Batman the much needed chance to stand out and show he has a well deserved place on the Justice League team. His dark humour is also apparent, and although perhaps not as dominant as Flash’s or Green Lantern’s, it adds to this feel of the comic being not only great but a fun one too.
Perhaps the biggest advancement in plot in this issue is the discovery that the Hyperclan are actually Martians, ie from the same planet as Martian Manhunter, which goes to describe why Martian Manhunter feels some empathy and reluctance to fight back against them. However its this very discovery which gives Batman the upper hand, in that a Martians weakness is fire, which is why the Hyperclan were unable to check if Batman had survived the crash due to the flames. Naturally Batman takes advantage of this by luring some of the Hyperclan into a room spew with gasoline and setting it alight.
Artwise, the comic has its highs and lows, but it is still increasingly irritating as to how poor the Green Lantern looks in certain panels. Just compared to Flash who is usually in the same panel as him in this issue, there really is a sheer difference in quality. Of course there are positives, with the biggest being the brilliantly drawn scenes of Batman infiltrating the Hyperclans base and using the shadows to his advantage.
Yet again then, the combined effort of Morrison, Porter and Dell has produced another brilliant issue featuring the worlds greatest heroes, and things only look to get better.
VERDICT
STORY: 8.5/10
ART: 7.5/10

    REVIEW - JLA #3

    Title: War Of The Worlds

    Writer: Grant Morrison

    Art: Howard Porter

    Inks: John Dell

    With the majority of the Justice League captured, its down to Flash, Green Lantern and Batman to save the day in these bleak times. What ensues is a issue full of energy and excitement, but perhaps most importantly, fun.

    It would seem hard to make a comic dealing with the potential end of the world fun, but Grant Morrison does it brilliantly. Morrison makes Flash and Green Lantern as the younger heroes of the team much more entertaining. Be it a simple joke or just the occasional banter between the two heroes, Morrison the issue shine with the two young heroes by displaying there not the same as say Superman, but their youthful and entertaining personalities make them likeable in their own way.

    However, despite all their youthful enthusiasm, things take a turn for the worse. Even though through their valiant effort, the two heroes fail to defeat the members of the Hyperclan. So who’s left to take on the Hyperclan and save the Earth? Batman.

    Last issue we witnesses Batman crash his jet into the ground and explode, but naturally its going to take more than that to kill the dark knight. If the Flash and Green Lantern hadn’t made this issue great already, well Batman just makes it awesome by completely stealing the spotlight and showing that although not having powers, he really is the most dangerous guy on Earth. His scenes are drawn and narrated beautifully, and it gives Batman the much needed chance to stand out and show he has a well deserved place on the Justice League team. His dark humour is also apparent, and although perhaps not as dominant as Flash’s or Green Lantern’s, it adds to this feel of the comic being not only great but a fun one too.

    Perhaps the biggest advancement in plot in this issue is the discovery that the Hyperclan are actually Martians, ie from the same planet as Martian Manhunter, which goes to describe why Martian Manhunter feels some empathy and reluctance to fight back against them. However its this very discovery which gives Batman the upper hand, in that a Martians weakness is fire, which is why the Hyperclan were unable to check if Batman had survived the crash due to the flames. Naturally Batman takes advantage of this by luring some of the Hyperclan into a room spew with gasoline and setting it alight.

    Artwise, the comic has its highs and lows, but it is still increasingly irritating as to how poor the Green Lantern looks in certain panels. Just compared to Flash who is usually in the same panel as him in this issue, there really is a sheer difference in quality. Of course there are positives, with the biggest being the brilliantly drawn scenes of Batman infiltrating the Hyperclans base and using the shadows to his advantage.

    Yet again then, the combined effort of Morrison, Porter and Dell has produced another brilliant issue featuring the worlds greatest heroes, and things only look to get better.

    VERDICT

    STORY: 8.5/10

    ART: 7.5/10

    — 1 year ago with 1 note
    #jlareviews  #jla  #superman  #batman  #superheroes  #Wonder Woman  #aquaman  #Flash  #green lantern  #martian manhunter  #dc  #DC comics  #grant morrison  #comics  #comic reviews 

    Ladies and Gentlemen, I present to you to the greatness that is the 60s Robin.

    — 1 year ago with 16 notes
    #batman  #robin  #60s  #60s batman  #adam west  #dc 
    REVIEW - JLA #2
Title: The Day The Earth Stood Still
Writer: Grant Morrison
Art: Howard Porter
Inks: John Dell

Things are hotting up for the JLA. With the Hyperclan turning the whole world against them successfully, there’s only one thing left for them to do. Eliminate the JLA, making this issue a high energy and action packed one from start to finish. Although there is a huge focus on the fighting, the plot line still advances dramatically, and with Morrison’s once again brilliant storytelling, JLA steps up its game once again.
As mentioned, this issue does feature a whole dose of action and fighting. If you love a issue filled with high octane violence, then this issue is definitely going to be for you. However, despite the action, Morrison is still able to keep things interesting, most notably with the scene of Martian Manhunter. We witness him meeting Protax, the leader of Hyperclan. Protax plays on Manhunter’s desire to fit in on Earth, and while not put across explicitly, it would seem Martian Manhunter just might be a little more than influenced from Protax’s words.
However, thats the least of the JLA’s problems. With the Hyperclan spilt up and spread out across Earth in separate watchtowers, the JLA split up and head to each separate watchtower to confront the members of Hyperclan. Superman and Batman team up, while Green Lantern, Flash and Martian Manhunter team up, leaving Wonder Woman on her own. Leaving the woman to take on a tower on her own? Surely would have made sense to get Green Lantern or Flash to go with her? Just felt a bit odd, but lucky enough Aquaman springs into action when Wonder Woman lands herself into a spot of trouble.
My main problem with this issue though is Aquaman himself. I don’t know an awful lot about Aquaman, but from how Morrison puts him across, hes a bit of an asshole. His arrogant self centered attitude makes him come across as irritable. Maybe Morrison did want to make him a controversial character, I mean Batman can be arrogant and self centered at times too right? The difference here though is Batman is likeable. Aquaman just comes across as stubborn and annoying.
Aquaman aside, the rest of the comic is brilliant. Just like in issue one, each character gets a chance to shine during each of their battles with the Hyperclan, and no battle fails to impress. Superman’s brawn and might is put across brilliantly, while Batman taking on A-Mortal in his jet fighter is a great scene as well.
The artwork in this issue also really shines through. Aside from yet again the odd looking Green Lantern face, Porters artwork is detailed and striking throughout, and just helps to really breath life into the high energy action scenes. I particularly enjoyed the artwork featuring Flash and Zum as they speed over the desert. With the bright colours mixed with the blurring of the characters, the sense of speed and danger really comes across and draws you in as a reader.
The issue ends on quite a cliffhanger, with supposedly all of the JLA dead aside from Superman who is slowly dieing from Krypotonite. Of course its highly unlikely they are all dead, we wouldn’t have a series if they were right? Regardless, your left with a sense of disbelief and eagerly want to crack on with next issue, which if the this issue and the previous have anything to say about, is shaping up to be a great one.
VERDICT
STORY: 8.5/10
ART: 7.5/10

    REVIEW - JLA #2

    Title: The Day The Earth Stood Still

    Writer: Grant Morrison

    Art: Howard Porter

    Inks: John Dell

    Things are hotting up for the JLA. With the Hyperclan turning the whole world against them successfully, there’s only one thing left for them to do. Eliminate the JLA, making this issue a high energy and action packed one from start to finish. Although there is a huge focus on the fighting, the plot line still advances dramatically, and with Morrison’s once again brilliant storytelling, JLA steps up its game once again.

    As mentioned, this issue does feature a whole dose of action and fighting. If you love a issue filled with high octane violence, then this issue is definitely going to be for you. However, despite the action, Morrison is still able to keep things interesting, most notably with the scene of Martian Manhunter. We witness him meeting Protax, the leader of Hyperclan. Protax plays on Manhunter’s desire to fit in on Earth, and while not put across explicitly, it would seem Martian Manhunter just might be a little more than influenced from Protax’s words.

    However, thats the least of the JLA’s problems. With the Hyperclan spilt up and spread out across Earth in separate watchtowers, the JLA split up and head to each separate watchtower to confront the members of Hyperclan. Superman and Batman team up, while Green Lantern, Flash and Martian Manhunter team up, leaving Wonder Woman on her own. Leaving the woman to take on a tower on her own? Surely would have made sense to get Green Lantern or Flash to go with her? Just felt a bit odd, but lucky enough Aquaman springs into action when Wonder Woman lands herself into a spot of trouble.

    My main problem with this issue though is Aquaman himself. I don’t know an awful lot about Aquaman, but from how Morrison puts him across, hes a bit of an asshole. His arrogant self centered attitude makes him come across as irritable. Maybe Morrison did want to make him a controversial character, I mean Batman can be arrogant and self centered at times too right? The difference here though is Batman is likeable. Aquaman just comes across as stubborn and annoying.

    Aquaman aside, the rest of the comic is brilliant. Just like in issue one, each character gets a chance to shine during each of their battles with the Hyperclan, and no battle fails to impress. Superman’s brawn and might is put across brilliantly, while Batman taking on A-Mortal in his jet fighter is a great scene as well.

    The artwork in this issue also really shines through. Aside from yet again the odd looking Green Lantern face, Porters artwork is detailed and striking throughout, and just helps to really breath life into the high energy action scenes. I particularly enjoyed the artwork featuring Flash and Zum as they speed over the desert. With the bright colours mixed with the blurring of the characters, the sense of speed and danger really comes across and draws you in as a reader.

    The issue ends on quite a cliffhanger, with supposedly all of the JLA dead aside from Superman who is slowly dieing from Krypotonite. Of course its highly unlikely they are all dead, we wouldn’t have a series if they were right? Regardless, your left with a sense of disbelief and eagerly want to crack on with next issue, which if the this issue and the previous have anything to say about, is shaping up to be a great one.

    VERDICT

    STORY: 8.5/10

    ART: 7.5/10

    — 1 year ago with 3 notes
    #jlareviews  #jla  #superman  #batman  #Flash  #Wonder Woman  #martian manhunter  #green lantern  #aquaman  #dc  #DC comics  #comic reviews  #comics 
    REVIEW - JLA #1
Writer: Grant Morrison
Art: Howard Porter
Inks: John Dell

So today I thought I would review a comic series I haven’t on the blog before, and what better one to select then the pre New 52 JLA series by acclaimed writer Grant Morrison. During the late 90s, Dc was suffering a bit of slump in sales, as superheros individual comic series weren’t seeming to generate the desired income. To fix this, DC got Grant Morrison on the case, and as a result, they made a series combining all the greatest and well known superheroes, the JLA, also known as the Justice League Of America. The series began in September 1997, and although Morrison’s run ended as of issue 41, the comic went on for many years until its end in April 2006 as of issue 125. But lets start from the beginning with issue one. Is it good? It certainly is.

Whats immediately gripping about the first issue is the actual plot. I mean sure there’s the “baddies” who are introduced, but there put across by Morrison in such a way it really does make you question this. These people, known as the “Hyperclan”, claim to be wanderers who aim to only help and aid planets as their own was destroyed by corruption and greed many years ago. The Hyperclan go about making things prosper, such as making deserts full of plant life and green land in order to help the human race. At first glance they seem to actually be good guys, but further on there’s this underlining idea that things aren’t as they seem. However, Morrison keeps this sense of unease and mystery throughout the issue and keeps you wanting more by the end of it. One thing is clear, Morrison knows how to write a gripping and original story.
What’s also brilliant is how each JLA character is managed and each gets the chance to shine. Well I say everyone, just Aquaman is strangely missing from the team in this issue despite being a member. Aside from Aquaman, each member gets a chance to shine in the issue, but even better, each character has their own individual personality that makes each one unique in their own way. Superman has his strong sense of leadership, while Flash for example brings a sense of humour to the group. For example his girlfriend nags him to bring her Jacket home and before she has a chance to finish he whizzes there and back in a instant. Morrison really has a grip on all his characters and makes each one unique and interesting.
The only thing that really bothers me about the title is the actual artwork. I can appreciate it being drawn in 1997, but compared to some other comics from the 90s, some of the artwork in places is really poor. In particular, Porter seems to struggle in drawing a consistent and well drawn Green Lantern. In many panels his face is scrunched up and irregular, and compared to how other characters like Flash is drawn, there’s a shocking difference in quality. That’s not to say its all bad though, the art in most places is bold and colourful, breathing life into these superheroes.
Overall then, JLA #1 is the beginning of something very special indeed, and its brilliant storytelling and character development by Morrison is brilliant. A great comic all around. Just a bit of a shame about the artwork though.
VERDICT
STORY: 8.5/10
Art: 6.5/10

    REVIEW - JLA #1

    Writer: Grant Morrison

    Art: Howard Porter

    Inks: John Dell

    So today I thought I would review a comic series I haven’t on the blog before, and what better one to select then the pre New 52 JLA series by acclaimed writer Grant Morrison. During the late 90s, Dc was suffering a bit of slump in sales, as superheros individual comic series weren’t seeming to generate the desired income. To fix this, DC got Grant Morrison on the case, and as a result, they made a series combining all the greatest and well known superheroes, the JLA, also known as the Justice League Of America. The series began in September 1997, and although Morrison’s run ended as of issue 41, the comic went on for many years until its end in April 2006 as of issue 125. But lets start from the beginning with issue one. Is it good? It certainly is.

    Whats immediately gripping about the first issue is the actual plot. I mean sure there’s the “baddies” who are introduced, but there put across by Morrison in such a way it really does make you question this. These people, known as the “Hyperclan”, claim to be wanderers who aim to only help and aid planets as their own was destroyed by corruption and greed many years ago. The Hyperclan go about making things prosper, such as making deserts full of plant life and green land in order to help the human race. At first glance they seem to actually be good guys, but further on there’s this underlining idea that things aren’t as they seem. However, Morrison keeps this sense of unease and mystery throughout the issue and keeps you wanting more by the end of it. One thing is clear, Morrison knows how to write a gripping and original story.

    What’s also brilliant is how each JLA character is managed and each gets the chance to shine. Well I say everyone, just Aquaman is strangely missing from the team in this issue despite being a member. Aside from Aquaman, each member gets a chance to shine in the issue, but even better, each character has their own individual personality that makes each one unique in their own way. Superman has his strong sense of leadership, while Flash for example brings a sense of humour to the group. For example his girlfriend nags him to bring her Jacket home and before she has a chance to finish he whizzes there and back in a instant. Morrison really has a grip on all his characters and makes each one unique and interesting.

    The only thing that really bothers me about the title is the actual artwork. I can appreciate it being drawn in 1997, but compared to some other comics from the 90s, some of the artwork in places is really poor. In particular, Porter seems to struggle in drawing a consistent and well drawn Green Lantern. In many panels his face is scrunched up and irregular, and compared to how other characters like Flash is drawn, there’s a shocking difference in quality. That’s not to say its all bad though, the art in most places is bold and colourful, breathing life into these superheroes.

    Overall then, JLA #1 is the beginning of something very special indeed, and its brilliant storytelling and character development by Morrison is brilliant. A great comic all around. Just a bit of a shame about the artwork though.

    VERDICT

    STORY: 8.5/10

    Art: 6.5/10

    — 1 year ago with 2 notes
    #jlareviews  #jla  #superman  #batman  #wonder woman  #green lantern  #Flash  #aquaman  #martian manhunter  #grant morrison  #comics  #comic reviews  #dc  #dc comics 
    REVIEW - Stitched #3
Writer: Garth Ennis
Artist: Mike Wolfer

This is more like it. With issue 3 finally picking up pace a bit, and with a mix of action and plot development, this issue raises the bar from last months and is a great issue overall.
The comic continues from where we left off, with a large group of Stitched heading towards our group of soldiers. Although the idea of the Stitched attacking is slowly becoming a common sight, the way the team overcome them and defeat them is quite clever. Cooper, Twiggy and Baz lure the Stitched into a secluded area, with Baz wearing a helmet and pretending to have a limp to make the reader believe its Commander Pruit. When the Stitched pursue them into the secluded area, the team take cover while the rest of the team emerge and flank the masked controllers of the Stitched in heroic fashion to put and end to the situation. What is also nice about this is the art works really well. Very little dialogue is used, which allows you to focus more on the art and helps build up the tension, resulting in a captivating and tense moment for the team as well as the reader.
Unfortunately, what seems to happen in this issue as well as in previous issues is the art never seems to impress me fully. While the action scenes are well drawn, there are to many instances when things just don’t look right, especially when characters are drawn from a distance. At one point, there is a panel of all the characters sitting down from a fair distance, and many of the faces are impossible to make out, and Twiggy’s face in the panel is just ludicrous.
The clear high point of this issue though is the beginning of the discovery of how the Stitiched are created. The team capture a prisoner who was accompained by the Stitched going by the name of Nigel, and after being forced and interrogated he explains how he saw the Stitched being created. As he narrates, Mike Wolfers panels depicts what he describes, and its vivid to say the least. People are forced to intake this strange substance into their body which “mummifies” them. Once they are mummified, they are sewn up “so the soul cannot escape”. After this, the body is pierced with a knife, and soon after the body awakens as a Stitched. Of course, despite the issue explaining this, there is still lots left unanswered, such as what is the black substance? I feel Garth Ennis has been clever enough to give the reader some input to keep them gripped, but still keeping the reader on edge and wanting more, and hes done it well.
The issue ends rather suddenly, with no sudden cliffhanger or surprise, but im confident the issue is picking up pace and is defintely a great improvement over last issue. Hers hoping issue 4 is just as good.
VERDICT
STORY: 8/10
ART: 6/10

    REVIEW - Stitched #3

    Writer: Garth Ennis

    Artist: Mike Wolfer

    This is more like it. With issue 3 finally picking up pace a bit, and with a mix of action and plot development, this issue raises the bar from last months and is a great issue overall.

    The comic continues from where we left off, with a large group of Stitched heading towards our group of soldiers. Although the idea of the Stitched attacking is slowly becoming a common sight, the way the team overcome them and defeat them is quite clever. Cooper, Twiggy and Baz lure the Stitched into a secluded area, with Baz wearing a helmet and pretending to have a limp to make the reader believe its Commander Pruit. When the Stitched pursue them into the secluded area, the team take cover while the rest of the team emerge and flank the masked controllers of the Stitched in heroic fashion to put and end to the situation. What is also nice about this is the art works really well. Very little dialogue is used, which allows you to focus more on the art and helps build up the tension, resulting in a captivating and tense moment for the team as well as the reader.

    Unfortunately, what seems to happen in this issue as well as in previous issues is the art never seems to impress me fully. While the action scenes are well drawn, there are to many instances when things just don’t look right, especially when characters are drawn from a distance. At one point, there is a panel of all the characters sitting down from a fair distance, and many of the faces are impossible to make out, and Twiggy’s face in the panel is just ludicrous.

    The clear high point of this issue though is the beginning of the discovery of how the Stitiched are created. The team capture a prisoner who was accompained by the Stitched going by the name of Nigel, and after being forced and interrogated he explains how he saw the Stitched being created. As he narrates, Mike Wolfers panels depicts what he describes, and its vivid to say the least. People are forced to intake this strange substance into their body which “mummifies” them. Once they are mummified, they are sewn up “so the soul cannot escape”. After this, the body is pierced with a knife, and soon after the body awakens as a Stitched. Of course, despite the issue explaining this, there is still lots left unanswered, such as what is the black substance? I feel Garth Ennis has been clever enough to give the reader some input to keep them gripped, but still keeping the reader on edge and wanting more, and hes done it well.

    The issue ends rather suddenly, with no sudden cliffhanger or surprise, but im confident the issue is picking up pace and is defintely a great improvement over last issue. Hers hoping issue 4 is just as good.

    VERDICT

    STORY: 8/10

    ART: 6/10

    — 1 year ago with 2 notes
    #stitchedreviews  #stitched  #avatar  #avatar press  #comics  #comic reviews  #garth ennis  #mike wolfer 
    REVIEW - Terror Titans #6
Title: Part 6: One Second To Midnight
Writer: Sean Mckeever
Art: Joe Bennett
Inks: Jack Jadson
Colours: Rod Reis

It was already made clear that from the previous issue that the storyline of this miniseries has declined dramatically, so its already clear “Terror Titans” isn’t going to go down as a tremendous miniseries. However despite some minor flaws in this final issue, it is undoubtedly a exciting and thrilling end to the miniseries.
The beginning really, is my main problem with the issue. Everything seems to happen so quickly for my liking, as in only a few pages the whole Martyr Militia is freed from its brainwashing and return to the side of good, leaving the Terror Titans severely outnumbered. The thing that only bothers me about this is how it happens. Turns out Star Spangled Kid is actually Miss Martian in disguise. She claims she was on a mission to avenge a fellow friend and had to work undercover in utmost secrecy. It all seems a little thrown together and rushed though, and by the end of her explanation I’m left not really caring and more interested In what Ravager is doing at this moment.
At this point, its clear the comic turns up the excitement and thrill factor. As if Disruptor being burnt to a crisp by Clock King isn’t exciting enough, the penultimate final showdown of Ravager against Clock King really is just a brilliantly scripted and drawn action scene. As soon as Clock King releases his deadly tools seen in previous issues, you know your in a for a epic fight. As Ravager dodges the incoming weapons and attempts to fight back, she then heroically stops herself and deliberately grabs the spinning spheres in her hand and crushes them. Ouch. As a result, Clock King is forced to use hand to hand combat, and its here Ravager catches him off guard grabbing him and pounding him in the face. Double ouch. It is just exciting from start to finish, and definitely the comics greatest asset.
Once Clock King is defeated, the final few pages are spent resolving certain issues and restoring equilibrium. Most notably and rather touchingly, is how the remaining Terror Titans escape and help each other escape from Prison. Copperhead escapes who then rescues Dreadbolt, and then they both proceed to rescue Persuader. Perhaps cheesy in some peoples eyes, but their reunion is touching and when they transport back to Dark Side Club, their new found home for themselves, it just feels a nice way to wrap up the miniseries.
The art in the comic also steps up the game, with some of the best seen in all of the miniseries. The artwork most stands out during the Ravager and Clock King fight, and the brilliant way certain panels are drawn to reflect the speed of Ravager and Clock King’s spheres is a definite high point and really displays Bennetts skill. Elsewhere other characters look great throughout, especially Clock King in certain scenes which really display his evil and somewhat creepy persona and state of mind.
In conclusion, Terror Titans was never meant to be anything that would shake the comic book world. With a not so perfect storyline to name but a few errors, Terror Titans is not an amazing miniseries. What it is however, is a action packed and fun read from start to finish, and issue 6 is the prime and best example for this.
VERDICT
Story: 8/10
Art: 7/10

    REVIEW - Terror Titans #6

    Title: Part 6: One Second To Midnight

    Writer: Sean Mckeever

    Art: Joe Bennett

    Inks: Jack Jadson

    Colours: Rod Reis

    It was already made clear that from the previous issue that the storyline of this miniseries has declined dramatically, so its already clear “Terror Titans” isn’t going to go down as a tremendous miniseries. However despite some minor flaws in this final issue, it is undoubtedly a exciting and thrilling end to the miniseries.

    The beginning really, is my main problem with the issue. Everything seems to happen so quickly for my liking, as in only a few pages the whole Martyr Militia is freed from its brainwashing and return to the side of good, leaving the Terror Titans severely outnumbered. The thing that only bothers me about this is how it happens. Turns out Star Spangled Kid is actually Miss Martian in disguise. She claims she was on a mission to avenge a fellow friend and had to work undercover in utmost secrecy. It all seems a little thrown together and rushed though, and by the end of her explanation I’m left not really caring and more interested In what Ravager is doing at this moment.

    At this point, its clear the comic turns up the excitement and thrill factor. As if Disruptor being burnt to a crisp by Clock King isn’t exciting enough, the penultimate final showdown of Ravager against Clock King really is just a brilliantly scripted and drawn action scene. As soon as Clock King releases his deadly tools seen in previous issues, you know your in a for a epic fight. As Ravager dodges the incoming weapons and attempts to fight back, she then heroically stops herself and deliberately grabs the spinning spheres in her hand and crushes them. Ouch. As a result, Clock King is forced to use hand to hand combat, and its here Ravager catches him off guard grabbing him and pounding him in the face. Double ouch. It is just exciting from start to finish, and definitely the comics greatest asset.

    Once Clock King is defeated, the final few pages are spent resolving certain issues and restoring equilibrium. Most notably and rather touchingly, is how the remaining Terror Titans escape and help each other escape from Prison. Copperhead escapes who then rescues Dreadbolt, and then they both proceed to rescue Persuader. Perhaps cheesy in some peoples eyes, but their reunion is touching and when they transport back to Dark Side Club, their new found home for themselves, it just feels a nice way to wrap up the miniseries.

    The art in the comic also steps up the game, with some of the best seen in all of the miniseries. The artwork most stands out during the Ravager and Clock King fight, and the brilliant way certain panels are drawn to reflect the speed of Ravager and Clock King’s spheres is a definite high point and really displays Bennetts skill. Elsewhere other characters look great throughout, especially Clock King in certain scenes which really display his evil and somewhat creepy persona and state of mind.

    In conclusion, Terror Titans was never meant to be anything that would shake the comic book world. With a not so perfect storyline to name but a few errors, Terror Titans is not an amazing miniseries. What it is however, is a action packed and fun read from start to finish, and issue 6 is the prime and best example for this.

    VERDICT

    Story: 8/10

    Art: 7/10

    — 1 year ago with 2 notes
    #terrortitansreviews  #Terror Titans  #ravager  #Copperhead  #Clock King  #dreadbolt  #persuader  #Star Spangled Kid  #Static Shock  #DC comics  #dc  #comics  #comic reviews 
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